Multi-Task Welding Gloves - Designed to Perform Beyond Welding

Non-traditional, high-performance welding gloves by Caiman® and Ironcat® for all welding tasks.

Welding Cut Protection Taken To A New Level

Explore PIP® best-selling Caiman® and Ironcat® welding gloves that are now available with cut resistant liners to deliver unparalleled protection and performance.

Grinding Hazards And The Essential PPE To Keep Workers Safe

Flying debris, sparks, hazardous dust….just some of the many hazards you encounter when using an angle grinder.

PIP® offers the right personal protective equipment for above-the-neck, hand and body protection to protect workers from these hazards.

Protective Clothing For Welding

Protection. Performance. Comfort.

This inherently dangerous occupation requires choosing the right protection to minimize safety risks, maximize worker productivity and optimize the quality of the weld. PIP® offers the right product designed specifically for protecting professional welders that are tailored to work in the toughest applications.

KEY MARKETS

AEROSPACE

AEROSPACE

Involves the manufacturer and repair of airplanes, jets and helicopters in the aircraft industry.

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Fire

The sparks and expulsion of molten metal produced by welding and cutting processes are ready sources of ignition that can travel up to 35 feet (10 meters) from their source. Because sparks can travel so far, any combustible material in the immediate area can pose a significant fire hazard.

Electric Shock

A person may get an electric shock hazard if incidentally the hands or other part of the body create a bridge between the welding supply (e.g., the live welding electrode) and the welding return (e.g., workpiece) of the welding circuit/equipment. Increased electrical contact with the ground increases the risk of shock.

Sparks

The immediate danger welders encounter is the danger of burns on the body: Sparks can fly into shoes or eyes and cause injury. To protect the body from sparks, welders should wear high-necked, low flammability protective clothing, leather protective gloves and a welding helmet.

Hot Metal

Welders are frequently exposed to hot metals. There are several hazards to be aware of while you are working. The main hazards are inhalation of fumes, skin burns, eye hazards, and fires.

Welding arcs and flames emit intense visible, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation. UV radiation in a welding arc will burn unprotected skin just like UV radiation in sunlight. This hazard is true for direct exposure to UV radiation as well as radiation that is reflected from metal surfaces, walls, and ceilings.

Acute exposure to welding fume and gases can result in eye, nose and throat irritation, dizziness, and nausea. Health effects from certain fumes may include metal fume fever, stomach ulcers, kidney damage and nervous system damage. Prolonged exposure to manganese fume can cause Parkinson's-like symptoms.

Common Hazards

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

Involves using a variety of welding techniques to fuse together car parts and complete structural repairs on vehicles.

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Fire

The sparks and expulsion of molten metal produced by welding and cutting processes are ready sources of ignition that can travel up to 35 feet (10 meters) from their source. Because sparks can travel so far, any combustible material in the immediate area can pose a significant fire hazard.

Electric Shock

A person may get an electric shock hazard if incidentally the hands or other part of the body create a bridge between the welding supply (e.g., the live welding electrode) and the welding return (e.g., workpiece) of the welding circuit/equipment. Increased electrical contact with the ground increases the risk of shock.

Sparks

The immediate danger welders encounter is the danger of burns on the body: Sparks can fly into shoes or eyes and cause injury. To protect the body from sparks, welders should wear high-necked, low flammability protective clothing, leather protective gloves and a welding helmet.

Hot Metal

Welders are frequently exposed to hot metals. There are several hazards to be aware of while you are working. The main hazards are inhalation of fumes, skin burns, eye hazards, and fires.

Welding arcs and flames emit intense visible, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation. UV radiation in a welding arc will burn unprotected skin just like UV radiation in sunlight. This hazard is true for direct exposure to UV radiation as well as radiation that is reflected from metal surfaces, walls, and ceilings.

Acute exposure to welding fume and gases can result in eye, nose and throat irritation, dizziness, and nausea. Health effects from certain fumes may include metal fume fever, stomach ulcers, kidney damage and nervous system damage. Prolonged exposure to manganese fume can cause Parkinson's-like symptoms.

Common Hazards

STRUCTURAL

STRUCTURAL

Involves creating the metal framework for buildings and bridges as well as cut and repair beams, columns, and girders.

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Fire

The sparks and expulsion of molten metal produced by welding and cutting processes are ready sources of ignition that can travel up to 35 feet (10 meters) from their source. Because sparks can travel so far, any combustible material in the immediate area can pose a significant fire hazard.

Electric Shock

A person may get an electric shock hazard if incidentally the hands or other part of the body create a bridge between the welding supply (e.g., the live welding electrode) and the welding return (e.g., workpiece) of the welding circuit/equipment. Increased electrical contact with the ground increases the risk of shock.

Sparks

The immediate danger welders encounter is the danger of burns on the body: Sparks can fly into shoes or eyes and cause injury. To protect the body from sparks, welders should wear high-necked, low flammability protective clothing, leather protective gloves and a welding helmet.

Hot Metal

Welders are frequently exposed to hot metals. There are several hazards to be aware of while you are working. The main hazards are inhalation of fumes, skin burns, eye hazards, and fires.

Welding arcs and flames emit intense visible, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation. UV radiation in a welding arc will burn unprotected skin just like UV radiation in sunlight. This hazard is true for direct exposure to UV radiation as well as radiation that is reflected from metal surfaces, walls, and ceilings.

Acute exposure to welding fume and gases can result in eye, nose and throat irritation, dizziness, and nausea. Health effects from certain fumes may include metal fume fever, stomach ulcers, kidney damage and nervous system damage. Prolonged exposure to manganese fume can cause Parkinson's-like symptoms.

Common Hazards

OIL & GAS

OIL & GAS

Involves operating welding equipment to fuse metals using various cutting, gouging and welding processes on pipelines, rigs, plants and facilities.

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Fire

The sparks and expulsion of molten metal produced by welding and cutting processes are ready sources of ignition that can travel up to 35 feet (10 meters) from their source. Because sparks can travel so far, any combustible material in the immediate area can pose a significant fire hazard.

Electric Shock

A person may get an electric shock hazard if incidentally the hands or other part of the body create a bridge between the welding supply (e.g., the live welding electrode) and the welding return (e.g., workpiece) of the welding circuit/equipment. Increased electrical contact with the ground increases the risk of shock.

Sparks

The immediate danger welders encounter is the danger of burns on the body: Sparks can fly into shoes or eyes and cause injury. To protect the body from sparks, welders should wear high-necked, low flammability protective clothing, leather protective gloves and a welding helmet.

Hot Metal

Welders are frequently exposed to hot metals. There are several hazards to be aware of while you are working. The main hazards are inhalation of fumes, skin burns, eye hazards, and fires.

Welding arcs and flames emit intense visible, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation. UV radiation in a welding arc will burn unprotected skin just like UV radiation in sunlight. This hazard is true for direct exposure to UV radiation as well as radiation that is reflected from metal surfaces, walls, and ceilings.

Acute exposure to welding fume and gases can result in eye, nose and throat irritation, dizziness, and nausea. Health effects from certain fumes may include metal fume fever, stomach ulcers, kidney damage and nervous system damage. Prolonged exposure to manganese fume can cause Parkinson's-like symptoms.

Common Hazards

METAL FABRICATION SHOPS

METAL FABRICATION

Involves a manufacturing process used to shape metal into parts or end products.

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Fire

The sparks and expulsion of molten metal produced by welding and cutting processes are ready sources of ignition that can travel up to 35 feet (10 meters) from their source. Because sparks can travel so far, any combustible material in the immediate area can pose a significant fire hazard.

Electric Shock

A person may get an electric shock hazard if incidentally the hands or other part of the body create a bridge between the welding supply (e.g., the live welding electrode) and the welding return (e.g., workpiece) of the welding circuit/equipment. Increased electrical contact with the ground increases the risk of shock.

Sparks

The immediate danger welders encounter is the danger of burns on the body: Sparks can fly into shoes or eyes and cause injury. To protect the body from sparks, welders should wear high-necked, low flammability protective clothing, leather protective gloves and a welding helmet.

Hot Metal

Welders are frequently exposed to hot metals. There are several hazards to be aware of while you are working. The main hazards are inhalation of fumes, skin burns, eye hazards, and fires.

Welding arcs and flames emit intense visible, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation. UV radiation in a welding arc will burn unprotected skin just like UV radiation in sunlight. This hazard is true for direct exposure to UV radiation as well as radiation that is reflected from metal surfaces, walls, and ceilings.

Acute exposure to welding fume and gases can result in eye, nose and throat irritation, dizziness, and nausea. Health effects from certain fumes may include metal fume fever, stomach ulcers, kidney damage and nervous system damage. Prolonged exposure to manganese fume can cause Parkinson's-like symptoms.

Common Hazards

RAILROAD

RAILROAD

This segment duties are to install or repair railroad equipment or the actual railways upon which railcars run, which includes the tracks and other equipment along a route.

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Fire

The sparks and expulsion of molten metal produced by welding and cutting processes are ready sources of ignition that can travel up to 35 feet (10 meters) from their source. Because sparks can travel so far, any combustible material in the immediate area can pose a significant fire hazard.

Electric Shock

A person may get an electric shock hazard if incidentally the hands or other part of the body create a bridge between the welding supply (e.g., the live welding electrode) and the welding return (e.g., workpiece) of the welding circuit/equipment. Increased electrical contact with the ground increases the risk of shock.

Sparks

The immediate danger welders encounter is the danger of burns on the body: Sparks can fly into shoes or eyes and cause injury. To protect the body from sparks, welders should wear high-necked, low flammability protective clothing, leather protective gloves and a welding helmet.

Hot Metal

Welders are frequently exposed to hot metals. There are several hazards to be aware of while you are working. The main hazards are inhalation of fumes, skin burns, eye hazards, and fires.

Welding arcs and flames emit intense visible, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation. UV radiation in a welding arc will burn unprotected skin just like UV radiation in sunlight. This hazard is true for direct exposure to UV radiation as well as radiation that is reflected from metal surfaces, walls, and ceilings.

Acute exposure to welding fume and gases can result in eye, nose and throat irritation, dizziness, and nausea. Health effects from certain fumes may include metal fume fever, stomach ulcers, kidney damage and nervous system damage. Prolonged exposure to manganese fume can cause Parkinson's-like symptoms.

Common Hazards

SHIPYARDS

SHIPYARDS

Involves helping build and repair ships. In this role, you may replace or repair metal parts of a ship's structure. A shipyard welder can work on a ship of any size, ranging from small yachts to aircraft carriers or cruise ships, but many specialize in a specific type of vessel.

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Fire

The sparks and expulsion of molten metal produced by welding and cutting processes are ready sources of ignition that can travel up to 35 feet (10 meters) from their source. Because sparks can travel so far, any combustible material in the immediate area can pose a significant fire hazard.

Electric Shock

A person may get an electric shock hazard if incidentally the hands or other part of the body create a bridge between the welding supply (e.g., the live welding electrode) and the welding return (e.g., workpiece) of the welding circuit/equipment. Increased electrical contact with the ground increases the risk of shock.

Sparks

The immediate danger welders encounter is the danger of burns on the body: Sparks can fly into shoes or eyes and cause injury. To protect the body from sparks, welders should wear high-necked, low flammability protective clothing, leather protective gloves and a welding helmet.

Hot Metal

Welders are frequently exposed to hot metals. There are several hazards to be aware of while you are working. The main hazards are inhalation of fumes, skin burns, eye hazards, and fires.

Welding arcs and flames emit intense visible, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation. UV radiation in a welding arc will burn unprotected skin just like UV radiation in sunlight. This hazard is true for direct exposure to UV radiation as well as radiation that is reflected from metal surfaces, walls, and ceilings.

Acute exposure to welding fume and gases can result in eye, nose and throat irritation, dizziness, and nausea. Health effects from certain fumes may include metal fume fever, stomach ulcers, kidney damage and nervous system damage. Prolonged exposure to manganese fume can cause Parkinson's-like symptoms.

Common Hazards

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